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Course Offerings at CHS

Clarenville High School offers a wide range of courses and programs for our students.  If you have any questions or are unsure of where to find information please feel free to call or e-mail our Administration for clarification!

 

Grade 10

 

English 1201 (Academic)

English 1201 is an academic course for students entering Level I of senior high school. The study of language and experiences will allow students to develop an increasingly sophisticated understanding of literacy tools and communication devices. A range of texts will enable students to reflect on their own learning strategies as they develop confidence as language users. Students will interpret, analyze and evaluate a variety of texts and create texts using various forms. The course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing and media literacy skills necessary for success in daily life as well as secondary and post secondary studies.

English 1202 (General)

 English 1202 is designed for students entering Level l who continue to require extra support in order to strengthen essential language and literacy skills.

Literacy 1204 (General)

 Literacy 1204 is a course aimed at developing:
• literacy skills and strategies to support the reading and writing demands of senior high school courses (read and write to learn)
• reading, listening and viewing strategies that enable students to decode, interact with, retain and interpret information, or reconstruct texts (learning to read, listen and watch to learn)
• writing and speaking strategies that enable students to communicate effectively and organize, consider and reflect on ideas (learning to write and speak to learn)
• strategies that enable students to transfer learned skills to new situations
• meaningful experiences with a variety of texts and sources of information

World Literature 3207 (Academic - Optional Language)

 The purpose of this course is to explore the continuum between the traditional and the contemporary. World Literature 3207 asks students to explore international texts from a wide variety of genres, including myths, legends and folktales. The course is intended to provide students with an opportunity to study and respond to both classical and contemporary texts. Through reading and responding to such literature, students should gain a greater understanding and appreciation for the stories that have informed and entertained readers and listeners for centuries. Students should come to recognize common themes that shape our world.

Math 1201 (Academic)

Mathematics 1201 is intended for students who plan to undertake academic or advanced mathematics in Level II. It addresses the needs of the majority of students coming from the Intermediate Mathematics program.
Topics include:
• Measurement
• Trigonometry
• Roots and Powers
• Factors and Products
• Relations and Functions
• Linear Functions
• Systems of Linear Equations

Math 1202 (General)

 The Applied Mathematics courses 1202, 2202 and 3202 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the workforce.
Topics include:
• Consumerism and Travel
• Measuring Length
• Measuring Area
• Getting Paid For Your Work
• All About Angles
• Pythagorean Relation
• Trigonometry

 

 

Science 1206 (Academic)

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Sustainability of Ecosystems
• Chemical Reactions
• Motion
• Weather Dynamics

Art Tech 1201 (Fine Arts)

 Art Technologies 1201 engages students in the artistic process by which images are perceived, created, and evaluated. This program provides students with an historical perspective on the close relationship between perception, technology, and image making. It introduces students to a working method that can be expanded and elaborated upon in studio courses at further grade levels.
Art Technologies 1201 is divided into three sections:
• Perception, the Eye, and Technology: deals with the basic principles and concepts vital to the creative process.

• Perception, Art, and Technology focuses on technology and its relationship to image-making, as well as, the basic perceptual tools artists use to create images.
• Perception, Culture, and Technology explores the influences that visual imagery and new technologies are+ having on culture.

Canadian Geo 1202 (Canadian Studies)

 This course introduces students to systems thinking, understanding how things influence one another within a whole. Students investigate topics in physical, human and economic geography and apply systems thinking to examine and respond to issues affecting
Canadians.
Topics in this course include:
• interactions between human and natural systems
• issues related to population change
• the economic significance of natural resources
• the implications of globalization for Canada

NL Studies 2205

(Fine Arts OR Canadian Studies)

 This course examine the culture and heritage of the province. It draws from the content and processes used in both the arts and the social sciences to encourage students to think deeply about “this place”. Students represent their knowledge and understandings using forms such as drama, photography, song, and storytelling. Students become better informed citizens who can contribute to shaping the future of the province. They serve as culture-bearers, helping preserve the rich, diverse culture and varied history of “this place”.

PE 3100 & 3101

(PE Credits)

Physical Education 3100 / 3101 are activity based courses which focus on developing and understanding personal movement skills that contribute to an active lifestyle throughout life. The curriculum builds on the skills and knowledge acquired throughout the physical
education program from Kindergarten to level II, and in addition:
• places a strong emphasis on outdoor/adventure activities and provides opportunities to develop appreciation for nature and the outdoors
• provides skills needed to assess risk and make decisions that minimize hazards to self and others
• requires students to assume varying levels of participation within groups such that cooperation among leaders, followers, supporters, facilitators, helpers and other roles becomes essential for harmonious, successful group function
• focuses on varying levels of participation and/or leadership within the school and community
The program includes a broad range of movement activities that are employed through three movement themes:
• Fitness Pursuits
• Individual/Partner Games and Activities
• Team/Group Games and Activities

Science 2200

(General)

 The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Sustainability of Ecosystems
• Weather Dynamics

French 1200

(ORC & Optional Language)

The High School Core French Program enables students to develop second language proficiency through the purposeful use of language.
Students engage in authentic tasks with a focus on oral production, oral interaction, reading and viewing, and writing and representing.
Topics include:
• adolescent Life:
• travel
• the world around me

 

Grade 11

 

English 2201 (Academic)

 English 2201 is an academic course intended for students whose goals include post-secondary academic study. English 2201 emphasizes literary texts and is intended to enable students to be
analytical and critical readers and viewers and to give detailed accounts of complex and sophisticated texts. Students are required to examine and evaluate ideas and style in materials studied and in their own work. Students will also be expected to express themselves precisely and to use technology and multimedia applications to solve problems and conduct inquiries. Emphasis will be placed on exposure to and use of a wide variety of styles found in texts from various places and periods, including
• poetry, novels, short prose, plays, and myths from different times, cultures, and places
• research papers
• film, video, radio, television and live drama
• multimedia texts, databases, CD-ROM reference sources, and newsgroups

English 2202

(General - Both Grade 12 and Grade 11 students are taking it this year.)

 English 2202 provides experiences which enable students to
• understand ways in which language can entertain, inform, and influence others
• adapt their language to suit their purposes
• have a sound basic knowledge of how to use English and its conventions in their daily lives
• extend their thinking by exploring a range of issues
• use language to the best of their ability in working toward the full range of curriculum outcomes
• explore and investigate social, political, ethical, and economic issues
• respond to other points of view
• study and produce various forms of writing, particularly nonnarrative forms used in student groups, family units, service organizations, political organizations, and business communities, including letters of application, request, and letters to the editor
• reconstruct messages in the form of minutes, reports, press releases, informal and formal oral presentations
• practise oral communication related to the world of work (e.g., job interviews)

Math 2201 (Academic)

 The Academic Mathematics courses 2201 and 3201 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that do not require the study of calculus.

Topics include:
• Inductive and Deductive Reasoning
• Mathematics Inquiry
• Properties of Angles and Triangles
• Acute Triangle Trigonometry
• Radicals
• Statistical Reasoning
• Quadratic Functions
• Quadratic Equations
• Proportional Reasoning

Math 2200 (Advanced)

 The Advanced Mathematics courses 2200, 3200 and 3208 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of calculus.
Topics include:
• Sequences and Series
• Trigonometry
• Quadratic Functions
• Quadratic Equations
• Radical Expressions and Equations
• Rational Expressions and Equations
• Absolute Value and Reciprocal Functions
• Systems of Equations
• Linear and Quadratic Inequalities

Math 2202 (General)

 The Applied Mathematics courses 1202, 2202 and 3202 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the workforce.
Topics include:
• Surface Area
• Drawing and Design
• Volume and Capacity
• Interpreting Graphs
• Banking and Budgeting
• Slope
• Right Triangles and Trigonometry

 

Biology 2201

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy. Topics Include:

• Matter and Energy for Life
• Biodiversity
• Maintaining Dynamic Equilibrium I
• Interactions Among Living Things

Physics 2204

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Kinematics
• Dynamics
• Work and Energy
• Waves

 

Chemistry 2202

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Stoichiometry
• From Structures to properties
• Organic Chemistry

Skilled trades 1201

This course provides students with an experiential introduction to six specific residential, construction-based skilled trades. Students engage in activities involving carpentry, plumbing, electrical, drywall and plastering, painting, and masonry. Students work with tools and equipment to complete tasks associated with internal aspects of residential construction. This approach is accomplished through modules designed to emulate the real world as closely as possible within the laboratory environment. This learning may be applied to certification requirements in these trades.
This course consists of three units:
• Apprenticeship and the Skilled Trades
• Skills Common to All Trades
• Skill Building in Selected Trades

Design Fab. 1201

In the production sector, design and fabrication are mutually dependent and interrelated activities. This course provides an introduction to design and the design process. Students will develop products using a variety of drawing tools and computer-aided design (CAD) software and then create their designs in the fabrication lab.
Working in small and large groups, students will experience the process of design, product formulation and fabrication common to industry. The hands-on portion of this course will constitute upwards of 60% of the class time and enable students to become proficient with a variety of hand, power and stationary power tools.
The course consists of six units:
• Introduction to Design
• Fabrication Techniques
• Introduction to Shop Practices
• Graphical Communications
• Introduction to CAD/CAM
• The Design Project

Earth Systems 3209

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

• Introduction to Earth Systems
• Historical Geology
• Earth Materials
• The Forces within Earth
• Earth Resources: Real-Life Applications 

Environment Science (General)

 The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Introduction to Environmental Science
• Recreation in the Environment
• Land Use and the Environment
• Water use and the Environment
• The Atmosphere and the Environment

PE 2100 & 2101

Physical Education 2100 / 2101 are activity based courses which focus on developing and understanding personal movement skills that contribute to an active lifestyle throughout life. The program:
• meets the needs and interests of adolescent students;
• extends the range of skills and knowledge acquired from kindergarten to grade nine;
• facilitates and builds upon movement concept knowledge;
• provides an opportunity for personal achievement through group and individual activities; and

• acknowledges the wide range of teacher expertise, equipment, and facilities available.
The curriculum includes a broad range of movement activities that are employed through three movement themes:
• Individual/Partner Games and Activities
• Alternative Activities
• Games and Group Activities

 

 

Nutrition 2102

Nutrition 2102 examines the role of nutrients in food and how they affect one’s overall growth and development. Students develop skills in relation to choosing the healthiest food based on a variety of factors, such as lifecycle needs, health status, economic circumstances, and lifestyle. Students learn to work within existing resources to plan healthy meals. Students will participate in eight laboratory experiences that focus on healthy food preparation
techniques. 

The units of study are:
• Food Choices and Nutritional Needs
• Food Selection, Preparation and Storage
• Menu and Meal Planning

Nutrition 3102 (ORC)

Nutrition 3102 examines an individual’s overall health and the factors that influence it, such as media, lifestyle, and medical history. From a national and global perspective, students study food in terms of production, technological advances and security. Students examine the roles they play locally, nationally and internationally to help manage resources and to action plans that ensure a safe, secure food system. Students will participate in eight food laboratories that support key concepts introduced in the course.
There are three units of study:
• Food, Nutrition and Health
• Food Technology and Production
• Food Security

Power and Energy 3205 (ORC)

 This course features two modular-based projects, one focused on small engine repair, the other on alternative energy production. In the small engine module, students troubleshoot a variety of engine types. Students engage in alternative energy production through the use of models of wind turbines, solar cells, power distribution systems, fuel cells.
This combination of theory and experiential learning provides students with both practical knowledge and develops their abilities as critical thinkers and innovative problem solvers.
The five main units are:
• Safety
• Introduction to Engines
• Experiencing Small Engines Modularly
• Alternative Energy
• Experiencing Alternative Energy Modularly

French 2200 (ORC)

The High School Core French Program enables students to develop second language proficiency through the purposeful use of language. Students enage in authentic tasks with a focus on oral production, oral interaction, reading and viewing, and writing and representing.
Topics include:
• adolescent Life:
• travel
• the world around me
 

 

World Religions 3101 & 3106

(ORC & this course can be used for average purposes in world studies for MUN entrance)

 These courses examine the world’s significant living belief systems.
Students read, view, listen and respond to various texts related to these living belief systems in order to develop an understanding of the history, views and influences of each.
Students will:
• examine each living belief system regarding their views on creation, birth, death, god, destiny, and afterlife
• determine how living belief systems affect and are affected by a rapidly changing society
• explore the role of faith, morality, and ethics in each living belief system
• gain an understanding of the influence of science on creation as understood by various living belief systems
• understand how living belief systems vary with regard to their rituals, festivals, symbols, key beliefs and sacred texts

Consumer Studies 1202 (ORC)

This course is an introduction to consumer affairs. It helps students become rational and effective consumers and provides them with skills in research and critical thinking, relative to the marketplace.
Topics for inquiry include:
• needs versus wants
• organizational features of Canadian business
• effective consumer purchasing
• management of personal resources
• consumer protection
• corporate citizenship

Applied Music 2206/3206 (Fine Arts)

The Applied Music courses 2206 and 3206 offer students the opportunity to develop musicianship, musical literacy skills, theoretical understandings and competencies as instrumentalists and / or vocalists through individual and small group experiences.
Both courses are available for beginning students as well as those with prior experience. They may be offered as separate classes in the following applied areas:
• Voice
• Piano / Keyboard
• Guitar
• Strings
• Winds (Brass / Woodwinds)
• Percussion

Career Ed 2201

This course is designed to help students develop the skills they need to continuously make effective career decisions throughout their lives. Students will be required to complete and maintain an “Employability Skills Portfolio” that they can enhance throughout their academic studies and working career. To receive credit for this course students are also required to complete a minimum 30 hours of community service prior to graduation.
The course outcomes are organized along three major strands:
• Personal Management
• Career Exploration - Learning and Work
• Career Preparation - Life and Work Building

 

Grade 12

 

English 3201 (Academic)

 English 3201 is an academic course intended for students whose goals include post-secondary academic study. English 3201 satisfies the “honours” requirement for graduation purposes.
English 3201 emphasizes literary texts and is intended to enable students to be analytical and critical readers and viewers and to respond to complex and sophisticated texts orally and through writing and other ways of representing.

Math 3208

The Advanced Mathematics courses 2200, 3200 and 3208 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of calculus.
Topics include:
• Pre-Calculus
• Limits and Continuity
• Rational Functions
• Derivative
• Applications of Derivatives
• Calculus of Trigonometry
• Calculus of Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
• Antidifferentiation and Integration

 

Math 3201 (Academic)

 The Academic Mathematics courses 2201 and 3201 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into post secondary programs that
do not require the study of calculus.

Topics include:
• Set Theory
• Counting Methods
• Probability
• Rational Expressions and Equations
• Polynomial Functions
• Exponential Functions
• Logarithmic Functions
• Sinusoidal Functions
• Financial Mathematics: Borrowing Money

Math 3200 (Advanced)

 The Advanced Mathematics courses 2200, 3200 and 3208 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of calculus.
Topics include:
• Polynomial Functions
• Function Transformations
• Radical Functions
• Trigonometry and the Unit Circle
• Trigonometric Functions and Graphs
• Trigonometric Identities
• Exponential Functions
• Logarithmic Functions
• Permutations, Combinations, and the Binomial Theorem

Math 3202 (General)

 The Applied Mathematics courses 1202, 2202 and 3202 are designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the workforce.
Topics include:
• Measurement and Probability
• Working With Data
• Linear Relationships
• Financial Decisions
• Properties of Figures
• Transformations
• Trigonometry

Science 3200 (General)

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Chemical Reactions
• Motion

Bio 3201

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Maintaining Dynamic Equilibrium II
• Reproduction and Development
• Genetic Continuity
• Evolution, Change and Diversity

Physics 3204

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Force, Motion, and Energy
• Fields
• Matter Energy Interface

Residential Construction 2201

In this course students focus on interior and exterior residential construction, i.e., aspects of finishing carpentry, electrical, and metal work. The course introduces students to design techniques, building codes, and construction methods. Students experience the trades through a series of modules within the fabrication laboratory. Instructors provide general  demonstrations followed by facilitation and mentoring.
Units include:
• Introduction to Skilled Trades and Apprenticeship
• Courses Common to all Construction Trades
• Career Exploration – Learning and Work

Design Fab 2202

This course is designed for students who may be interested in exploring careers in Engineering and Engineering Technology. Students work with computer aided design (CAD), computer aided
manufacturing (CAM) and computer numerical control (CNC) sequences of advanced design and automation. Production will include tools for stock preparation and automatic routers.
Units of study will include:
• Engineering Design and Manufacture
• CNC Programming Basics
• Basic CNC Operations
• Three-Dimensional Computer Aided Design
• Computer Aided Manufacturing
• The Design Project
• Careers in CAD / CAM / CNC

Chemistry 3202

The high school science program continues the development of students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• From Kinetics to Equilibrium
• Acids and Bases
• Thermochemistry
• Electrochemistry

 

 

Studio Art 3200

(Fine Arts)

 Art Technologies 2200 and Art and Design 3200 are studio art courses structured in nine units to offer students the opportunity to develop personal imagery using a variety of media. Three of these nine units will be studied in Art and Design 2200 and another three units will be explored in Art and Design 3200 such that a student completing both courses will have had exposure to a total of six different units of study. Students work with visual problems, study past and present cultures, and participate in the creative process and production of art.
The nine units from which to build studio explorations include:
• drawing 

• sculpture

• photography

• fibre arts, painting

• print making

• graphic arts

• pottery

• media arts

French 3200 (ORC)

 The High School Core French Program enables students to develop second language proficiency through the purposeful use of language. Students enage in authentic tasks with a focus on oral production, oral interaction, reading and viewing, and writing and representing.
Topics include:
• planning for success
• entertainment
• imagination
• wellness
• global issues
• cultural diversity

Human Dynamics 2206 (ORC)

Human Dynamics 2201 prepares young adolescents to make informed decisions in the areas of relationships, finances, child development and parenting. Students will learn how families
operate as an ecosystem, and how they contribute to the larger global ecosystem. There is a focus on the nature of personal and interpersonal skills as they apply to group dynamics and personal development at home, at school, and in the labour market. Parenting and child development provides students with the opportunity to understand the importance of parenting and its effects on child development. The financial resource management component addresses the development of skills and strategies for financial management now and in the future in order to reach predetermined short- and long-term goals.
There are four units of study:
• Family As Ecosystem
• Relationships
• Parenting and Child Development
• Financing Your Dreams

Ethics 2106

Ethics and Social Justice 2106 examines the roots and influences, including religious and spiritual, of social activism and responses to social justice issues. Students discuss the concepts of social justice and social activism and the role ethics may play in social justice
issues. They will reflect on their own world view and consider the implications of striving to create a global community.
Students will:
• assess the effects of media on social justice issues
• examine the ethical implications and effects of technology on the
global community
• identify and respond to social justice issues
• assess their own contributions to social activism
• evaluate the influence of living belief systems on social justice
issues

Ethics 2101

 Ethics and Philosophy 2101 introduces students to the foundational precepts of philosophy and the interdependence of ethical behaviour and philosophical and religious thought. Students will examine historical and philosophical influences, ethical and moral issues and
the connectedness of all creation.
Students will:
• assess their own ethical understanding of their decision making
• examine and analyze philosophical views and their influences throughout history
• explore different interpretations of sacred texts
• assess their own and others’ responses to questions about existence
• compare scientific and religious explanations of existence

Healthy Living 1200 (ORC & PE)

Healthy Living 1200 is a broad-based multi-disciplinary curriculum that encourages students to take responsibility for their own health.
Students will learn to develop a Personal Strategic Health Plan by examining their own health indicators and health practices, investigating relevant health topics, and exploring activities that will positively affect their health and well-being.
The curriculum is organized into four units of study:
• Active Lifestyles
• Healthy Eating
• Controlling Substances
• Personal Dynamics

Science 3200

 The high school science program continues the development of
students’ scientific literacy.

Topics include:
• Chemical Reactions
• Motion

Applied Music 2206/3206

(Fine Arts)

 The Applied Music courses 2206 and 3206 offer students the opportunity to develop musicianship, musical literacy skills, theoretical understandings and competencies as instrumentalists and / or vocalists through individual and small group experiences.
Both courses are available for beginning students as well as those with prior experience. They may be offered as separate classes in the following applied areas:
• Voice
• Piano / Keyboard
• Guitar
• Strings
• Winds (Brass / Woodwinds)
• Percussion

French 3201 (ORC)

Core French 3201
Topics include:
• francophone language and culture in Quebec
• francophone language and culture in France
• francophone language and culture in a global context 

World Geo 3218 (World Studies)

 Pilot Course

 

 

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